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FEH News

We try to avoid cross-posting on the CEES and FEH websites. CEES involvement in the Indiana Fluvial Erosion Hazard (FEH) Mitigation Program is most often discussed on the FEH website – but sometimes FEH projects are at the intersection of science, policy, and art, and then we want to share them with a broader audience. The CEES website is the place to do that.

Service Learning at Sodalis Nature Park April 5, 2014

Sodalis Nature Park has been dedicated to the protection of the Indiana bat otherwise known as Myotis sodalis. Service learning crews were asked to help clear the bat’s habitat of the invasive amur bush honeysuckle. The heaviest concentrations were in the floodplain areas.

Service Learning at Fort Harrison March 21, 2014

Before Picture

Emergence was the topic of the day. After such a long and grueling winter, spring was finally upon us and its signs were everywhere. There was not a lot of green in the woods, but the amor bush honeysuckle’s buds were just beginning to swell making them a slight more visible than their native neighbors. Several small snakes were sighted by our crew and hikers.

Service Learning at Ritchey Woods Nature Preserve October 26

A close-up of our culprit

On October 26, the CEES service learning team re-visited Ritchey Woods Nature Preserve. It was a cold and cloudy day but still many gathered to clear the invasive bush honeysuckle from the area fronting the main drive into the park. The north side of the lane was wooded while the south side lead to a wide open grassland.

Service Learning at Fort Harrison State Park October 11, 2013

Circled Area is Delaware Picnic Area

On Friday, Oct. 11 the service learning team arrived once again at Fort Harrison State Park. In the previous blog, we talked about the methods employed to remove bush honeysuckle from the Delaware Picnic Area. The map at the top of the screen shows the area that has been the subject of what are now four service learning projects at Fort Harrison State Park.

Service Learning at Ritchey Woods Natural Area September 27

Researchers, interns and students gathered Friday September 27, to participate in service learning projects at Ritchey Woods Natural Area. Ritchey Woods is 130 acres of natural area near 96th Street. It is a current restoration project monitored by CEES. Projects lasted half a day with as many as 30 participants per project.

Fall 2013 Service Learning at Fort Harrison Sept 6

Before Removal

The goal of this project was to remove invasive Japanese bush honeysuckle. The plant was first brought to America to help control erosion but soon became part of the problem. The plant is allelopathic which hinders growth from other plants within the bush’s understory.

Pleasant Run Plantings

We anticipate that live stakes will arrive on March 18. The contractor is going to use the live stakes to replace some plantings that did not survive last year's drought, and to increase bank stability in some stream reaches.

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